Power Outage Readiness

BE PREPARED FOR A POWER OUTAGE

A power outage may disrupt communication, water, and transportation. It may close retail businesses, gas stations, ATMs, banks, and other services. Power outages can also cause food to spoil, water contamination, and can prevent the use of medical devices.power outage 1

HOW TO PEPARE FOR A POWER OUTAGE

  • Take an inventory of the items you need that rely on electricity.
  • Plan for batteries and other alternative power sources to meet your needs.
  • Have flashlights for every household member.
  • Determine whether your home phone will work in a power outage and how long battery backup will last.
  • Talk to your medical provider about a power outage plan for medical devices powered by electricity and refrigerated medicines. Find out how long medication can be stored at higher temperatures and get specific guidance for any medications that are critical for life.
  • Sign up for local alerts and warning systems.
  • Have enough perishable food and water.
  • Use a thermometer in the refrigerator and freezer.
  • Keep mobile phones and other electric equipment charged and gas tanks full.


SURVIVING DURING A POWER OUTAGE

  • Keep freezers and refrigerators closed.
  • Use food supplies that do not require refrigeration.
  • Avoid carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Check on your neighbors.
  • Turn off or disconnect appliances, equipment, or electronics. Power may return with momentary “surges” or “spikes” that can cause damage.
  • If safe, go to an alternate location or shelter for heat or cooling.

 ppl outage mapReport and check on power outage status through PPL's outage map

RETURNING AFTER A POWER OUTAGE

  • When in doubt, throw it out! Any food that has been exposed to temperatures 40° or higher for two hours or more or has an unusual odor, color, or texture, should be thrown away.
  • If the power is out for longer than a day, discard any medication that should be refrigerated.

 

GENERATOR SAFETY

  • Generators and fuel should always be used outdoors and at least 20 feet away from windows, doors and attached garages.generator-testing-0416-preview-1648577747
  • Install working carbon monoxide detectors on every level of your home.
  • Keep the generator dry and protected from rain or flooding. Touching a wet generator or devices connected to one can cause electrical shock.
  • Always connect the generator to appliances with heavy-duty extension cords.
  • Let the generator cool before refueling. Fuel spilled on hot engine parts can ignite.
  • Follow manufacturer’s instructions carefully.